Unions worry about financial impact of blackouts on working class

South Africans are once again having to endure an unreliable power supply while struggling to absorb the costs of the latest fuel price hikes.

Commuters wait to get into their taxi at Bree Taxi rank in Johannesburg. Photo: AFP

CAPE TOWN — Unions and civil rights organizations are worried about the impact the latest episode of load shedding will have on the working class, warning it was likely to be catastrophic.

The electric utility implemented phase 2 blackouts on Wednesday morning, citing outages and a lack of backup supplies.

South Africans are once again having to endure an unreliable power supply while struggling to absorb the costs of the latest fuel price hikes.

Visvin Reddy, founder of People Against Petrol and Paraffin Price Increases.

He said this string of power cuts was compounded by devastating fuel price increases that would strangle South Africans who could barely make it to the next payday.

“It’s almost as if South Africans are being strangled in this country and we don’t get any help from the government. How do you expect people to survive when they haven’t received a raise? asked Reddy.

Reddy said it was time the government stepped in and did something to help those who couldn’t afford to keep their small businesses afloat.

Sizwe Pamla of Cosatu agreed: “The combination of these things is very disastrous for the working class.

As many South Africans struggle to pay for alternative methods to mitigate the impact of power cuts, the Department of Health has also raised concerns that it now has to shell out more money for keep generators running in hospitals.

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