Working Class – Premudraja http://premudraja.net/ Fri, 22 Oct 2021 04:13:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://premudraja.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4-150x150.png Working Class – Premudraja http://premudraja.net/ 32 32 Scott Boyd goes from graphic design, target shooting to teaching https://premudraja.net/scott-boyd-goes-from-graphic-design-target-shooting-to-teaching/ Fri, 22 Oct 2021 03:55:44 +0000 https://premudraja.net/scott-boyd-goes-from-graphic-design-target-shooting-to-teaching/ After competing on a varsity hunting sports team and working as a graphic designer for a clothing company, Scott Boyd decided to pursue a career in teaching. Boyd has completed the College of Education’s Teach in 12 program and is working as an art teacher at the Lucas Crossing School Complex in the Normandy Schools […]]]>

After competing on a varsity hunting sports team and working as a graphic designer for a clothing company, Scott Boyd decided to pursue a career in teaching. Boyd has completed the College of Education’s Teach in 12 program and is working as an art teacher at the Lucas Crossing School Complex in the Normandy Schools Collaborative. (Photo August Jennewein)

As a member of his varsity athletic team, Scott Boyd used his keen sense of focus and steady hand to knock small discs of clay out of the sky in an instant with the pull of a trigger.

He doesn’t use that steady hand to pull a lot these days, however. In recent years he has turned to art and a new career in arts education.

While competing as an undergraduate student at Lindenwood University, Boyd became interested in graphic design after first studying biology.

“It wasn’t something I was really looking for,” Boyd said. “I didn’t really take art classes at school. I don’t think I realized that art was a serious professional endeavor until I went to college.

After earning a bachelor’s degree and working in graphic design for several years, Boyd came to the University of Missouri-St. Louis to earn his teaching certificate through the Teach in 12 program. The College of Education’s unique program allows post-baccalaureate students interested in teaching to obtain their certification in approximately 12 months.

Boyd was already well acquainted with art and design, and the program quickly introduced him to structuring lesson plans, classroom management, and pedagogy. He also learned to adapt quickly to the unexpected in the classroom. It all came in handy this fall as he started his first teaching job as an art teacher at the Lucas Crossing School Complex in Normandy.

Considering his family background, the career change is not too surprising.

“I come from a family of teachers,” he says. “I knew some things very early on behind the curtain. My father was a teacher. Her sister was a teacher and administrator. My brother is in education and his fiancee is in education. So I am surrounded by teachers. I decided to join the club.

As a child, Boyd first learned to use a shotgun from the Boy Scouts. From there he became interested in deer hunting and other hunters introduced him to competitive target shooting.

The sport involves different games designed to test the accuracy and speed of shooters with a shotgun. The most common competitions are trap shooting, clay pigeon shooting and sport clays. Many targets – orange clay saucers – are thrown in front of the shooter from different angles depending on the game, often simulating hunting scenarios.

Boyd competed for a shooting team sponsored by a small shooting club in Pevely, Missouri, throughout high school. The team competed in tournaments across the Midwest, and the experience helped Boyd hone his marksmanship. Eventually he caught the attention of the Lindenwood sports team and got a scholarship.

However, joining a top team with multiple national titles was difficult at first, as Boyd was no longer the star.

“In high school I was shooting for a small shooting club, and in that group of shooters I was a big problem,” he said. “Then I go to Lindenwood, which is recruiting all over the world. “

Despite the initial adjustment, Boyd was grateful for the experience. He was able to travel a lot and shoot with teammates who were going to compete in the Olympics. He also discovered a passion for art and graphics when he was not on the range.

Boyd always had a knack for drawing and was only doing “poor” in his biology classes, so he decided to change his specialization. After graduating, he went to work as a graphic designer at a clothing company, Affiliate Merchandise Group.

“My first six months or so there, I realized how little I knew,” Boyd said. “I think that’s how a lot of people get into their first jobs, but I had an amazing mentor in this business – a crazy good illustrator.”

The company primarily designs custom t-shirts for fraternities and sororities, but it also has a retail side, which has allowed Boyd and his colleagues to get creative and experiment with new designs.

“It was fun because we got to explore different ideas that were turning our heads,” Boyd said. “My creative director was just a great guy, and we had a weekly meeting where we took some cool stuff that we found on Instagram that other artists were doing and had half hour art chats. . “

Boyd also worked on art projects in his spare time to express his creativity. One of them even caught the attention of one of his favorite musicians, BJ Barham, the singer and guitarist of the alternative country group American Aquarium. Boyd found inspiration for his works in Barham’s lyrics, which often focus on working-class labor issues.

The song “Brightleaf + Burley” describes the decline of the American Tobacco Company’s Pall Mall and Lucky Strike factories in North Carolina, where the group originated. A line in the chorus, “Greetings from Tobacco Town, USA,” made Boyd think of some bold vintage travel postcards.

“Design is digital collage,” Boyd said. “Basically, I took all of the Pall Mall and Lucky Strike ads that featured tobacco farmers, and I cut them out digitally to make the letters. It’s a postcard that says “Greetings from Tobacco Town USA”, but it incorporates the photos of these farmers as described by the American Tobacco Company. “

Barham messaged Boyd directly on Instagram to let him know how much he loved the design and inquired about the possibility of using it for American Aquarium merchandise in the future. It hasn’t been used so far, but Boyd is happy Barham enjoyed his work.

While working as a graphic designer was fulfilling, Boyd realized he wanted a more stable career, and he believed education offered it.

The streamlined process and affordability of the Teach in 12 program appealed to Boyd. He also found insightful lessons on the practical issues of running a classroom, particularly the course from Assistant Professor Jennifer Fisher. These lessons helped him think about how to keep a classroom on the move without freezing or overreacting.

“Every week she did a worst-case scenario, where something strange that’s going to happen at some point does happen,” he said. “How would you handle this? What’s the first step? How to get out of it?

Fisher only had the opportunity to work with Boyd in person a few weeks before the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, but he impressed her during that short amount of time and later while teaching online.

“He has been able to adapt to a fully online classroom environment and has managed to set himself apart by submitting top quality programs and illustrations on a regular basis,” she said. “Scott seemed to have an innate sense of what would work in the classroom, and I really enjoyed working with him.”

He has only been in his new position at Lucas Crossing for a few months, but thanks to UMSL he is ready to deal with whatever comes his way.

“Every day something totally new happens at work,” he said. “It’s a bit of controlled chaos, but I feel well equipped to meet the challenges in education.

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White House tells Democrats that corporate tax hike is unlikely in current bill – source https://premudraja.net/white-house-tells-democrats-that-corporate-tax-hike-is-unlikely-in-current-bill-source/ Wed, 20 Oct 2021 22:00:00 +0000 https://premudraja.net/white-house-tells-democrats-that-corporate-tax-hike-is-unlikely-in-current-bill-source/ The sun sets behind the United States Capitol in Washington, United States on October 6, 2021. REUTERS / Leah Millis / Files Oct. 20 (Reuters) – The White House told Democratic lawmakers on Wednesday that a proposal to raise corporate taxes in the United States would likely not appear in their social spending bill, according […]]]>

The sun sets behind the United States Capitol in Washington, United States on October 6, 2021. REUTERS / Leah Millis / Files

Oct. 20 (Reuters) – The White House told Democratic lawmakers on Wednesday that a proposal to raise corporate taxes in the United States would likely not appear in their social spending bill, according to a source in the Congress close to discussions.

President Joe Biden’s plan to raise the corporate tax rate to 28% from 21%, a key campaign pledge, will likely be one of the important concessions he makes to steer his economic stimulus package through of Congress, the White House revealed in the private meeting. with the best Democrats.

The White House declined to comment.

Biden, his aides and congressional leaders are rushing to strike a deal as early as this week on a series of tax hikes that they hope will fund more than $ 1.75 trillion over a decade in new programs ranging from child care to senior care, health care, affordable housing and climate. mitigation of change.

They have no margin for error because Democrats hold only a slim majority in the House of Representatives and the Senate. Republicans oppose the legislation.

“The president knows he won’t get everything he wants out of this package,” White House spokeswoman Jen Psaki told reporters on Air Force One. “No member of Congress either, probably, and that’s the point of the compromise.”

Biden, who pitched the 2020 election against then-Republican President Donald Trump, between working-class Scranton, Pa., And Park Avenue in Manhattan, presented the tax hike as an effort to ensure that the rich and the corporations pay their fair share. Trump and Republicans in Congress cut corporate rates to 21%, from 35% in 2017.

After taking office in January, Biden associated the tax hike with a mix of programs that he says will put the United States on a more sustainable economic footing to compete with China, from universal preschools to dental benefits for children. older people and incentives to encourage a switch to low-carbon energy sources.

Business groups and Republicans fought the measures, saying they would hamper the recovery of the economy after the COVID-19 pandemic.

Top Democrats can now put on the table other funding proposals for the bill that have been under discussion for weeks, including imposing new levies on share buybacks and business partnerships, according to a person close to the bill. case.

The S&P 500 (.SPX) closed 0.4% higher after news of the White House private comments was first reported by the Washington Post. After-hours trading in the US stock index rose 0.3%.

Reporting by Jarrett Renshaw; Additional reports by Nandita Bose; Writing by Trevor Hunnicutt; Editing by Leslie Adler and Peter Cooney

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.


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Our Kind of People star Yaya DaCosta has fun with natural hair on Primetime TV – Interview https://premudraja.net/our-kind-of-people-star-yaya-dacosta-has-fun-with-natural-hair-on-primetime-tv-interview/ Tue, 19 Oct 2021 16:01:59 +0000 https://premudraja.net/our-kind-of-people-star-yaya-dacosta-has-fun-with-natural-hair-on-primetime-tv-interview/ ALLURE: Your character, Angela Vaughn, has a hair care company called Eve’s Crown. As someone who has proudly been natural hair throughout your career in the public eye, I wonder if that was something that appealed to you about playing this character? YAYA DACOSTA: Oh yes. My love for hair and natural hair care started […]]]>

ALLURE: Your character, Angela Vaughn, has a hair care company called Eve’s Crown. As someone who has proudly been natural hair throughout your career in the public eye, I wonder if that was something that appealed to you about playing this character?

YAYA DACOSTA: Oh yes. My love for hair and natural hair care started when I was a kid and really solidified when I went to boarding school at age 13. I became my own hairdresser, as well as [the campus stylist] because we were in the middle of nowhere in Massachusetts, and there was nowhere to go.

Some people knew how to style their hair; I would do it outside of my dorm. I have always had my hair done myself and it was very expressive. I would be sure to finish all my homework and then work on a new hairstyle for the next day. I think the first year, in humanities class at the end, they give everyone superlatives, and mine was “most hairstyles ever seen in a year”.

Hair is definitely something that I have loved my whole life. As I got older and started to play, I started working with Chioma Valcourt. I always go to her to prepare for my roles. She does my weaves, hairpieces and extensions, lots of red carpets – she’s my secret weapon behind the scenes and I show up on set almost ready.

This show was an opportunity for me to say to him, “Hey, would you really like to work on the set of this great project?” For both of us, it was an opportunity to do what we’ve always done, which is to play, take risks when it comes to new styles, and be bold and expressive, but on a bigger scale. ladder. I don’t know if we’ve seen a character having so much fun with natural hair on TV, really. This is one of the things that attracted me to the role.

ALLURE: There’s a point in an episode where you talk to Morris Chestnut’s character, Raymond Dupont, and you mention that “a black woman’s relationship with her hair is generational. It’s personal, and it’s a lot. more than hot right now. ”Do you think there are any parallels with the evolution of the conversation about“ okay ”ways for black women to style their hair right now?



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An Educator’s Perspective: Expecting teachers to fill in the gaps is not a substitute for gifted and talented classes. Free tutoring might be a better plan https://premudraja.net/an-educators-perspective-expecting-teachers-to-fill-in-the-gaps-is-not-a-substitute-for-gifted-and-talented-classes-free-tutoring-might-be-a-better-plan/ Mon, 18 Oct 2021 11:20:58 +0000 https://premudraja.net/an-educators-perspective-expecting-teachers-to-fill-in-the-gaps-is-not-a-substitute-for-gifted-and-talented-classes-free-tutoring-might-be-a-better-plan/ Get essential education information and commentary delivered straight to your inbox. register here for the daily 74’s newsletter. MAyor Bill de Blasio’s decision to end the New York Talent Program offers education advocates, policymakers, and – like de Blasio’s time-limited – his successor the opportunity to rebuild the New York talent program. in a way […]]]>


Get essential education information and commentary delivered straight to your inbox. register here for the daily 74’s newsletter.

MAyor Bill de Blasio’s decision to end the New York Talent Program offers education advocates, policymakers, and – like de Blasio’s time-limited – his successor the opportunity to rebuild the New York talent program. in a way that better serves working New Yorkers, and provides an opportunity for the kids who need it most.

Even defenders of the current system will admit its myriad flaws. The word “gifted” implies that even before kindergarten some students have innate genius and others do not. This in itself seems dubious, but not as dubious as the idea that a single test given at age 4 could identify these children – or that 75% of them would be white and Asian. In the 2018-19 school year, half of the city’s gifted programs did not enroll any black students.

These numbers reflect the fact that, as in any system, families with resources and privileges can take advantage of them. Parents who could afford private lessons, had more time to spend with their 4-year-olds, and could find preparation materials might give their children a better chance. This, more than an innate ability, is the “gift” of these children.

But these children were not the only beneficiaries of G&T. For many working and low-income parents, including Asian families, who have the highest poverty rates in the city, G&T is a way for their children to make the American Dream come true. Many families with extremely limited resources refer them to G&T readiness, investing – literally – in their children.

Children deserve a first-rate education; and the public deserves top notch reporting on it.

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Many more families in poor and working-class neighborhoods were unable, for various reasons, to access G&T programs. But they, too, want better for their children – witness the influx of students into charter schools. Fortunately, there is a way to deliver accelerated education to those who want it and cannot afford to pay for academic enrichment outside of the school day: tutoring.

What has been mistakenly called “gifted” is in fact, in almost all cases, “time devoted to the task”. Charter schools learned long ago that the best way to improve student outcomes is to lengthen the school day, lengthen the school year, and ensure that as little time as possible is wasted. While tutoring has primarily been discussed as a way to catch up with students against pandemic-induced learning loss, it can also be used to achieve the same goal.

Related

Adams: More gifted and talented classes would help school diversity in New York, without harming it. here’s why

Between the $ 5 million saved by eliminating the G&T test and a small fraction of the

$ 6.9 billion in federal stimulus funding city schools receive, with every Kindergarten to Grade 2 child attending a Title I school could benefit from two hours per week of optional, free enrichment tutoring. Current undergraduate and graduate students, substitute teachers and others could provide the service, creating a pipeline of educators to fuel the system. Most children already have school-provided computers since the pandemic; devices could be distributed to those who do not. With a sufficiently large pool of guardians, each family would be able to select the hours that work best, so that parents can also be involved.

This would be a much better use of resources than the alternative proposed by de Blasio: to train already overworked teachers in accelerated teaching. Differentiating between teaching – teaching students who are at different levels at the same time – is an incredibly difficult skill that takes years to master. The idea that it can be successfully implemented for 4,000 teachers next year is a strain on credulity.

Many working families see G&T as a ladder out of a system in crisis. Parents know that many schools are not working for their children and they demand better. They deserve to have the accelerated learning they want for their children. It can be targeted, efficient and effective. Hopefully, on January 1, New York City has a mayor ready to roll up his sleeves and do this work on behalf of children.

Arthur Samuels is co-founder and co-executive director of MESA charter school in Brooklyn.

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Democrats weigh in on carbon tax after Manchin rejects key climate provision https://premudraja.net/democrats-weigh-in-on-carbon-tax-after-manchin-rejects-key-climate-provision/ Sat, 16 Oct 2021 22:37:31 +0000 https://premudraja.net/democrats-weigh-in-on-carbon-tax-after-manchin-rejects-key-climate-provision/ WASHINGTON – Some House and Senate Democrats, following a decision by West Virginia Democrat Senator Joe Manchin III to kill a major component of President Biden’s climate plan, are moving to Plan B: a tax on air pollution. carbon dioxide. A carbon tax, in which polluting industries would pay a levy for every tonne of […]]]>

WASHINGTON – Some House and Senate Democrats, following a decision by West Virginia Democrat Senator Joe Manchin III to kill a major component of President Biden’s climate plan, are moving to Plan B: a tax on air pollution. carbon dioxide.

A carbon tax, in which polluting industries would pay a levy for every tonne of carbon dioxide they emit, is seen by economists as the most effective way to reduce the emissions of the fossil fuels that heat the planet.

The near certain demise of the clean electricity program at the heart of Mr Biden’s program – which comes as scientists say aggressive policies are needed to avert the most devastating impacts of climate change – has sparked outrage from many. Democrats and has led many to say that now is the time for a carbon tax.

“I have had a carbon pricing bill in my office for three years waiting for the hour,” said Senator Ron Wyden, Democrat of Oregon, chairman of the Senate finance committee.

“What has been striking is the number of senators who have come to see me about this since the beginning of the fall – after Louisiana was hit by storms, the east coast flooding, the fires. Bootleg Forest here in my own state, ”Mr. Wyden said, speaking. by phone on Saturdays from Oregon. “Now there are a number of senators, key moderate senators, who have said they are open to this. And a lot of people in the House said they would support him if the Senate sent him. “

But a carbon tax can be politically explosive. Industries could pass on their higher costs, leaving President Biden and his fellow Democrats vulnerable to claims they raise taxes for the middle class, at a time when inflation and energy prices rise. Environmental justice advocates say a carbon tax allows companies to continue to pollute, albeit at a higher cost, disproportionately harming low-income communities. And it is not clear whether Mr Manchin, whose vote is crucial to Mr Biden’s legislative agenda, would support a carbon tax.

As a result, the White House is working to find alternatives to replace the $ 150 billion clean electricity program that had been the centerpiece of Mr. Biden’s climate program until just days ago, when Mr. Manchin indicated that he strongly opposed it. This program would have rewarded utilities that stopped burning fossil fuels in favor of wind, solar and nuclear power, and penalized those that did not. It was intended to push the country’s electricity sector to produce 80 percent of its electricity from clean energy sources by 2030, up from 40 percent today.

As they search for alternatives, White House officials are also considering a voluntary version of a cap-and-trade program, which would create a market for polluters to buy and sell allowances for a certain amount of money. ’emissions. They also plan to add to the $ 300 billion in tax incentives and clean energy credits that remain in the bill, while looking for ways to save parts of the clean electricity program.

A White House official said on Saturday that staff members were still in contact with members of Congress and had yet to agree to a final version of the climate provisions.

Cutting the climate change agenda could be one of the first big decisions in what will very likely be a painful process for Democrats as they cut their ambitious $ 3.5 trillion domestic policy agenda. Mr Manchin and another Democrat, Senator Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona, said they could not support this level of spending. Over the next two weeks, the White House will negotiate with Democrats for cuts to dozens of programs, as lawmakers attempt to reduce the initial bill to around $ 2 trillion.

Mr Biden suggested on Friday that one of the signature items on his agenda – two years of free community college – was also on the chopping block, and progressive lawmakers worried whether plans to provide time off family paid and to expand health insurance to include vision, dental and hearing benefits could survive.

Mr Biden and the Democratic leaders on Capitol Hill have set an Oct. 31 deadline for a deal that would allow Democrats to pass the bill with their very slim majorities in both houses of Congress.

In recent days, as White House officials tried to strike a deal, Manchin told them he would not support any legislation that included a clean electricity program. Mr Manchin, whose state is a major coal producer and has financial ties to the coal industry, said moving away from fossil fuels would undermine the country’s energy independence and worsen climate change.

After his opposition to the clean electricity program became public on Friday, several fellow Democrats expressed outrage.

“We have a moral obligation and a government mandate to adopt a policy that deals with climate change,” the progressive congressional caucus, made up of 96 members, wrote on Twitter. “Inaction is not an option.” For weeks, Progressive Democrats have been organizing rallies chanting, “No climate, no deal!” pressure the White House to include strong climate provisions. Several of these gatherings emphasized the importance of the clean electricity program.

Congress “cannot afford to dump” the climate provisions of the bill, New York Democrat Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez wrote on Twitter. “This problem is bigger than ideology. It is a moral imperative for humanity and the future of our planet to reduce and eventually eliminate emissions, ”she wrote. “There are a lot of ways to do it, but we can’t afford to give up. “

Oregon Democrat Senator Jeff Merkley attended the “No Climate, No Deal” rallies. “Listen, my condition is burning. We are losing our snowpack, the ocean is acidifying, affecting our seashells, ”he said on Saturday. “This is a code red. “

Mr Merkley has said he will not vote for a reconciliation deal that does not include “important climate provisions”, but he said he is open to any option that halves carbon dioxide emissions by 2030 and produce carbon-free electricity by 2035.

He suggested additional wind and solar subsidies or proposals to speed up the transition to clean energy vehicles.

“The Biden team is going to have to explain how they are going to achieve these two goals,” he said, “because that’s how we stay on track.”

The clean electricity program that Mr. Manchin opposed was remarkable because it would include both incentives and penalties. The payment to electric utilities to switch to clean energy was the carrot; a penalty for companies that did not replace fossil fuels with clean energy was the stick. A carbon tax could provide a similar incentive, when combined with tax incentives, analysts say.

“If you were to replace the clean electricity program with a price on carbon, I think it would go a long way. This would put a lot of the stick elements that were removed back into place, ”said Zeke Hausfather, climatologist and policy analyst at the Breakthrough Institute, an energy and climate research organization.

Mr Wyden’s staff, who draft the wording for the carbon tax, are considering a national carbon tax that could start at $ 15 to $ 18 a tonne, and that would increase over time, according to two people familiar with the matter. who were not allowed to speak. on the file.

The tax would be applied directly to coal mining companies, large natural gas processing plants, and petroleum refiners, based on the emissions associated with their products, with one exception: petroleum refiners would most likely be charged for producing diesel fuel and petrochemicals, but not gasoline – a way to protect most American drivers at the pump.

An important part of the policy, Mr Wyden said, will be using the income for tax refunds or checks for poor and working-class Americans – especially those employed in the fossil fuel industry. “You have to show workers and families, when there is an economy in transition, that they will get their money back,” he said. “They will be healed. “

Emily cochrane, Zolan Kanno-Youngs and Jim Tankersley contributed reports.


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Ronald Klain retweets after calling supply chain crisis a ‘high class’ problem https://premudraja.net/ronald-klain-retweets-after-calling-supply-chain-crisis-a-high-class-problem/ Thu, 14 Oct 2021 17:10:00 +0000 https://premudraja.net/ronald-klain-retweets-after-calling-supply-chain-crisis-a-high-class-problem/ White House Chief of Staff Ronald Klain was again criticized for a retweet this week when he shared a post that classified the recent nationwide economic malaise caused by a supply chain tightening as “high class problems”. Late Wednesday, Klain shared a post from Harvard professor Jason Furman and wrote “This” with two emoji hands […]]]>

White House Chief of Staff Ronald Klain was again criticized for a retweet this week when he shared a post that classified the recent nationwide economic malaise caused by a supply chain tightening as “high class problems”.

Late Wednesday, Klain shared a post from Harvard professor Jason Furman and wrote “This” with two emoji hands pointing one finger at the original tweet.

“Most of the economic issues we face (inflation, supply chains, etc.) are upper class issues. We wouldn’t have had them if the unemployment rate was still 10%. Instead, we would have had a much worse problem, ”Furman wrote, apparently referring to when Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome H. Powell said the employment rate in January was around. 10%.

While Furman, professor of economic policy, later clarified his comment was not a political analysis but his own “social judgment,” critics criticized Klain for appearing to agree with it and accused him of downplaying the pressing issues facing Americans.

“Inflation is NOT a ‘high class problem’. Inflation is a tax on American workers and those on fixed incomes ”, Rep Ted Budd (R-NC) tweeted. “The Biden / Harris White House is completely disconnected. #InflationIsTaxation.

Ronald Klain shared a post from Harvard professor Jason Furman.
Twitter

The House Republican Policy Committee called Klain’s tweet “outrageous.”

“Just the White House chief of staff calling the rising prices of gasoline, food and housing a problem of ‘high end’. Scandalous! The American people are suffering and deserve better leadership ”, the official twitter account of the committee has been published.

Rep. Elise Stefanik (R-NY), the Third House Republican, and advocacy group Independent Women’s Voice mimicked Klain’s use of emojis, using the same to criticize her post.

It’s wrong. Reminder – inflation is a tax on ALL Americans ”, she said.

“Disconnected from reality” Independent Women’s Voice wrote, followed by emoji.

On a separate account, Stefanik again highlighted Klain’s post, telling social media users that “this is what the Biden administration thinks about the American people.”

Los Angeles Shipping Port.
The United States is grappling with supply chain bottlenecks due to worker shortages and the COVID-19 pandemic.
Robyn Beck / AFP via Getty Images

“Upper class intellectuals and lower class American workers. (By the way, working class Americans are the ones who scrupulously save for their children’s vacations !!), ”she wrote. “An absolute shame. “

Rep. Kevin Hern (R-Okla.) Asked how the White House chief of staff could be “so out of touch with reality”.

“American families are spending over $ 175 more per month on living expenses and the White House response is ‘Well, could that be worse’ ?!” the rep tweeted.

Representative Steve Womack (R-Ark.) accuses the administration to change the message on inflation.

“First, the Biden administrator said inflation was a ‘short-term’ issue. Now it’s a ‘high class’ issue. The products the people of the Arkans need to put food on the table, fill up their homes and cars with gas, get to work and dress their children are NOT “high class” supplies. They impact family budgets on a daily basis, ”he said. he tweeted.

The White House did not immediately respond to the Post’s request for comment.

This isn’t the first time a retweet has put Klain under fire, as last month the chief of staff appeared to admit President Biden’s work-related vaccine mandate was the ‘ultimate solution’ to issuing a warrant. federal vaccine.

On the same day as Biden’s speech requiring two-thirds of all American workers to be vaccinated against COVID-19, MSNBC presenter Stephanie Ruhle tweeted that the move is “the ultimate workaround for the federal government to demand vaccinations” – which Klain retweeted in his feed.

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) called the move “silly” and called it an indication that “the administrator knows it is probably illegal” to force companies to implement rules on companies. vaccines under penalty of massive fines.

The workers unpack the cargo.
“First of all, the Biden administrator said inflation was a ‘short term’ issue. Now it’s a ‘high class’ issue,” Rep. Steve Womack told Ron Klain.
Megan Jelinger / AFP via Getty Images

“Important. Chief of Staff WH’s Foolish RT,” Cruz wrote at the time, sharing a screenshot of Klain’s retweet. “He said the quiet part out loud. Biden’s administrator knows it is It’s probably illegal (like the moratorium on evictions), but they don’t care.

Klain’s tweet on Wednesday comes as the United States faces a massive supply chain crisis that threatens the on-time delivery of everyday consumer goods and holiday gifts.



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Ace Powell’s latest painting and his lasting legacy https://premudraja.net/ace-powells-latest-painting-and-his-lasting-legacy/ Wed, 13 Oct 2021 11:13:54 +0000 https://premudraja.net/ace-powells-latest-painting-and-his-lasting-legacy/ In the late 1950s, when DuWayne Steiner was one of two conductors of the Great Northern Railway’s “bruck” now on permanent display at the Whitefish rail depot, he met Ace Powell at a bar one night in West Glacier. “We were both known to have a drink every now and then,” recalls Steiner, now 94, […]]]>

In the late 1950s, when DuWayne Steiner was one of two conductors of the Great Northern Railway’s “bruck” now on permanent display at the Whitefish rail depot, he met Ace Powell at a bar one night in West Glacier.

“We were both known to have a drink every now and then,” recalls Steiner, now 94, from his home in Conrad.

In the years that followed, Steiner developed a friendship with Powell, who was at the forefront of the Western art movement while also cementing a tremendous legacy that continues today. But it wasn’t until 1971 that Steiner bought his first piece from Powell, followed by a commission request for the artist to recreate in oil a 1907 black-and-white photo of Lake McDonald.

Fifty years later, these first two paintings – “Dead Headin ‘” and “Sunset on Lake McDonald” – are among the six that Steiner bequeathed to the Hockaday Museum of Art in Kalispell, one of which would be Powell’s last: one – 48-inch piece entitled “Prairie Fire”, completed several months before the artist’s death in 1978.

“I wish he could have done more, but I’m grateful for the ones he did,” Steiner said. “I have to be a good friend of his, and I want to leave what I have in Hockaday and keep Ace Powell alive.”

Hockaday Executive Director Alyssa Cordova calls Powell “our local Charlie Russell” while famous landscape painter Mark Ogle has said Powell was a central figure in establishing the modern Western art scene as a career path viable and respected for fine artists.

“There are just a myriad of people that Ace has influenced, including myself,” Ogle said. “Ace was truly a mainstay here for the arts.”

Cordova said Steiner wanted Powell’s pieces from his private collection to return to Kalispell even though he no longer lives in the area.

“These are important works and he wanted to make sure the audience could appreciate them here,” Cordova said.

“All men want to fly” by Ace Powell. Courtesy of the Hockaday Art Museum

The bequest was recently finalized and the museum is planning a Powell display once the works are in its possession, although Steiner isn’t quite ready to let go of them just yet.

“He wants to keep them with him until his last breath,” Cordova said. “His house is literally covered in Ace Powell art, and he enjoys sitting and watching them all day so much.”

The six paintings have been lovingly maintained but nonetheless hidden from the public for decades, enjoyed by Steiner, his wife Pam and their visitors.

“It’s amazing when you meet collectors like DuWayne, who come to this unassuming country house in Conrad, and you walk in and it’s just full of all this artwork,” Cordova said. “It’s incredible.”

Cordova said the more she researched Powell and his legacy, the more she realized how important the Steiner legacy was to the local community and the wider Western art world.

“When the art goes to a private collector or an auction, people can never see it unless you know that person and are invited to their home,” she said. “By bequeathing the work to a museum, it gives the work the opportunity to be visible to the public and for school visits and for educational purposes. We are truly grateful that he chose the Hockaday.

Ogle first met Powell in the late 1960s as a high school student when he began working at artist Kalispell’s bronze foundry, operated by Powell’s son Eddy. In addition to the foundry, Ogle, an aspiring artist, regularly visited Powell’s studio at the south end of downtown Kalispell.

“I never took a class with Ace, but I just watched him paint and learned,” Ogle said.

“Ace told me his goal was to create an art mecca in Flathead Valley, to bring together enough professional artists for people to fly or drive to buy art,” he said. added Ogle. “He wanted to leave that as a legacy. I never forgot that. I kind of continued that. And he achieved that goal. This area has become populated by professional artists and it is because of Ace’s imprint on this area.

Ogle says Powell helped launch the careers of a generation of gallery owners and art dealers such as Bernie Kushner, Paul Mesa and Van Kirke Nelson, while bringing in some of the area’s most famous artists, including Joe Abbrescia and Robert Cavanaugh.

“All of these artists have moved to this area, and I attribute that to Ace Powell’s magnetism, I absolutely attribute it to Ace,” Ogle said.

Ace Powell, left, at the Charlie Davis Pottery Store on 2 Mile Drive in Kalispell on April 3, 1976 for his 66th birthday. Photo courtesy of the Northwest Montana Historical Society

In addition to attracting renowned artists, Powell is committed to mentoring young artists, according to his son Dave Powell, also an artist who lives in Illinois. The 1970s catalyzed the modern Western art movement, led by a new middle class with disposable income and an interest in paintings depicting cowboys, Native Americans, wild animals and landscapes, as well as an upper class with even more money to spend on art, including a proliferation of Texas oil millionaires, Ogle said.

In northwestern Montana, Abbrescia and Powell are leading the way.

“It was a chain reaction and it continues today because of people like Joe Abressica and my dad,” said Dave Powell. “I think it helped build a foundation in the Montana community at the time and really gave a layer of work from which contemporary art could be shown and really have a good base.”

Joe Abbrescia, Jr. runs an art restoration business and gallery in downtown Kalispell. He said his father, who is considered one of the greatest American Impressionist and plein air painters of the 20th century, was in Chicago when he took note of Powell’s work. He told Kushner, who ran the Ace Powell Gallery in Kalispell, “He makes these skies; they cannot be real.

“Bernie said, ‘Come to Montana and see. “We have skies like this,” said Abbrescia, Jr ..

So Abbrescia came to Montana, where he became a close friend of Powell’s, “constantly sharing ideas about painting,” according to Abbrescia, Jr., who recalls that Powell perpetually had a cigarette on his lips or in his hand. He also remembers Powell as being extremely prolific, producing over 12,000 pieces during his career in a variety of media.

“That’s what was interesting about Ace, is that he did a lot of mediums, not just oil, but prints, bronzes, sculptures, watercolors, pen and ink. ink, cartoons, “said Abbrescia, Jr ..” This is one of the reasons he is still well known and still around today because he was so prolific. “

Powell was born in Tulerosa, New Mexico in 1912 and raised in Apgar at the southern end of Lake McDonald in Glacier National Park. As a child he watched Charlie Russell paint at Bull Head Lodge, and the great artist of the American West took the time to guide young Powell, informing him of his eventual decision to devote his life to art.

Powell’s childhood and early adulthood experience as a brittle and competing cowboy over horses influenced his work, as did his experience of aging during the Great Depression. Dave said his father took a blue collar approach to painting, waking up at 5 a.m. and painting until dinner at 7 p.m., with only periodic breaks to eat and, later in life, a nap.

In addition, Powell appealed to the working class. Dave said his dad “painted for the common people of Montana, and he priced it that way.”

“A regular guy could buy an Ace Powell for $ 20,” Dave said. “He felt that art was not exclusively for the upper class. He was a working class hero in that way.

“Sunset over Lake McDonald” by Ace Powell. Courtesy of the Hockaday / Private Collection of DuWayne Steiner

Dave said his father published everything he painted, regardless of the quality, letting the market decide if it was worth paying him for his labor and materials.

“You see Ace Powells who are great and you see Ace Powells who are not great,” said Dave.

Powell also had a sophisticated and noble side, liking the work of classical artists such as Auguste Rodin, Gustav Klimt and others. And while an everyday Montanan could afford a piece by Powell, his most sought-after works often ended up in private collections in Europe, Dave said.

“All real jewelry is still owned by private owners around the world,” Dave said.

For this reason, Dave says it is “wonderful” to see six of his father’s important paintings return to the public sphere from a private collection. Dave agrees that “Prairie Fire” is probably his father’s last completed work, although he said an unfinished painting was on his father’s easel on the day he died, January 25, 1978 in Kalispell. He expects more pieces to come out of private collections in the future.

“They are going to come out of the woods for generations to come,” he said.

Three days after Powell’s death, the Daily Inter Lake published a three-page series devoted to the artist. One story quoted Powell as saying that “the grass of the prairies has the quality of being as beautiful as a rose garden in a different light”, while calling death the “last greatest event of my life”.

In another tribute, Powell’s longtime friend and famous Browning sculptor Bob Scriver said that “every place Ace went, an artistic community would spring up.”

“You can follow his trail from Choteau to Browning via Hungry Horse and Kalispell,” said Scriver. “There would be no art in a community until Ace came along, then it would become an artistic community.”

The Ace Powell Memorial Award was established after the artist’s death and the first recipient of the award was Ogle.

“Due to the influence of the Powells on my life, it was quite an honor to receive this award,” said Ogle.

Among Powell’s many memories of Ogle, he remembers the crowds that formed around him at major art exhibitions, with everyone hoping to speak to the legendary artist.

“Because Ace was so influential in these art shows, other artists in the west of the country not only knew who Ace was, but they imitated Ace,” Ogle said. “And because he launched so many merchants into the Western art movement, I think it has spread throughout the West to some extent. He was truly the linchpin.


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Leaked Jon Gruden email renews questions about lack of transparency in WFT investigation https://premudraja.net/leaked-jon-gruden-email-renews-questions-about-lack-of-transparency-in-wft-investigation/ Sat, 09 Oct 2021 16:35:00 +0000 https://premudraja.net/leaked-jon-gruden-email-renews-questions-about-lack-of-transparency-in-wft-investigation/ Getty Images The NFL has managed to put all the evidence regarding the chronic bad behavior that has been occurring for years within the Washington organization in a nuclear sarcophagus. The NFL has not specifically requested a written report, guaranteeing nothing will surface – unless the league wants it. Earlier this week, someone wanted him. […]]]>

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The NFL has managed to put all the evidence regarding the chronic bad behavior that has been occurring for years within the Washington organization in a nuclear sarcophagus. The NFL has not specifically requested a written report, guaranteeing nothing will surface – unless the league wants it.

Earlier this week, someone wanted him.

Andrew Beaton from the Wall Street newspaper, who revealed the story of Jon Gruden’s racist email to former Washington executive Bruce Allen, surely didn’t find it in a dumpster or hacking into the league’s computer systems . Someone wanted Beaton to have it. Someone wanted Beaton to report it. And no one has seen fit to disclose any emails, other communications, or other potentially embarrassing or disturbing evidence regarding, for example, the behavior of Washington owner Daniel Snyder.

Let it settle. Snyder’s organization created a toxic work environment, and the league was successful in protecting Snyder from disclosure of facts or allegations uncovered during the entire investigation. Facts and allegations that resulted in an eight-figure fine for Snyder and a suspension without suspension that ends when the Commissioner decides it should end, unless he does not.

This is not a defense of Gruden. But he ended up taking shrapnel from the grenade which Snyder somehow avoided.

It is not known why the email was revealed on Friday. Some in league circles speculate that the NFL wants Gruden sacked by the Raiders. Others wonder if the NFL was trying to help NFLPA executive director DeMaurice Smith get enough votes to stay at work, instead of having a new executive director who might feel pressured to show up and to create potential problems for the league.

Either way, someone wanted this one and only email from Gruden to be made public. And no one wanted any facts or allegations directly implicating Snyder to be disclosed.

It is a double standard brimming with irony. Snyder’s mess could bring Gruden down. At a minimum, these are damaged goods. Snyder, on the other hand, will write a check and continue to truck.


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Ida Flooding Deaths pushes Council to demand New York climate change plan https://premudraja.net/ida-flooding-deaths-pushes-council-to-demand-new-york-climate-change-plan/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 12:16:00 +0000 https://premudraja.net/ida-flooding-deaths-pushes-council-to-demand-new-york-climate-change-plan/ A bipartisan group of Council members who pushed the measure for two years have long expressed frustration that the administrations of Mr de Blasio and his predecessor, Michael R. Bloomberg, have not acted faster to protect the New- Yorkers who live in less wealthy, working-class neighborhoods. City officials and lawmakers have taken a number of […]]]>

A bipartisan group of Council members who pushed the measure for two years have long expressed frustration that the administrations of Mr de Blasio and his predecessor, Michael R. Bloomberg, have not acted faster to protect the New- Yorkers who live in less wealthy, working-class neighborhoods.

City officials and lawmakers have taken a number of steps to make post-Sandy plans a reality, such as divesting pension funds from fossil fuel companies, steps to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the city. city ​​and efforts to consolidate parts of Lower Manhattan. Storm surge, Staten Island and Queens.

But in 2019, the city had spent just 54% of the $ 15 billion allocated by the federal government after the Sandy strike in 2012 to protect itself from climate-related dangers, and day-to-day climate policies were still in the hands of an alphabet. soup of municipal, state and federal agencies.

That year, Costa Constantinides, Mr Brannan’s predecessor as the head of the council’s resilience committee, and other city lawmakers presented the first draft of the bill.

He did not immediately gain the backing of the mayor or council leaders, but Ida and the deaths of 15 New York City residents, most of whom died in the basement flooding, changed the calculation, according to supporters of the measure. Since Ida, Mr de Blasio has released an updated climate resilience plan that commits $ 2.7 billion in new funding and underlines the urgency to address issues like basement flooding. But at the end of his term, most of the work will fall to his successor.

Eric Adams, the Democratic candidate and possibly the next mayor, has also released a new climate plan – far more detailed than anything he presented during the primary campaign – after the Ida floods.

The Council measure has been broadened from previous versions to cover a wider range of climate effects: not only waterfront flooding, but extreme precipitation, heat, wind and even forest fires. It obliges the mayor to deliver the first plan by September 30, 2022.

“People are finally starting to understand the scope of what climate change means for this particular city,” Bautista said.


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Base Teamsters reformers bid for union leadership https://premudraja.net/base-teamsters-reformers-bid-for-union-leadership/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 20:33:54 +0000 https://premudraja.net/base-teamsters-reformers-bid-for-union-leadership/ Last weekend, nearly four hundred Teamsters from across the country gathered in Chicago for the 46th annual Teamsters for a Democratic Union (TDU) convention. Members dropped into the Crowne Plaza Chicago West Loop, a unionized hotel near the city’s O’Hare International Airport, wearing sports shirts and jackets with the distinctive double-horse insignia of the International […]]]>

Last weekend, nearly four hundred Teamsters from across the country gathered in Chicago for the 46th annual Teamsters for a Democratic Union (TDU) convention. Members dropped into the Crowne Plaza Chicago West Loop, a unionized hotel near the city’s O’Hare International Airport, wearing sports shirts and jackets with the distinctive double-horse insignia of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters (IBT). With this year’s official Teamsters convention hosted online, the excitement at the TDU convention in person was palpable.

When they got down to work, it was to discuss grassroots organization within the IBT just before the November elections which will determine the new international union leadership. The agenda included workshops and conversations on union leadership, the election of TDU-backed candidates, membership activation and the existential threat posed by Amazon.

Over the years, TDU, a reform group of a few thousand members, has had a disproportionate influence on the IBT, which represents 1.4 million union members in sectors such as logistics, health care, construction, transport and communications. “We don’t call ourselves a caucus. We call ourselves a grassroots movement, ”said TDU national organizer Ken Paff. Jacobin.

In 1989, as union leaders faced charges under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) Act and in the midst of discussions to bring the union under federal trusteeship, TDU waged a successful campaign that won the members the right to vote directly for union leaders. . With the resignation of IBT general chairman James P. Hoffa after twenty-three years in office, the November election marks the first time a list of reforms has been in a position to win international leadership since the former chairman Ron Carey (1991-97) saw his election overturned on false accusations of embezzlement of union funds.

The current election boils down to two lists: Teamster Power, which is backed by Hoffa’s old guard, and Teamsters United, a coalition group backed by TDU. Hoffa’s departure will also mark the first time that an IBT president has voluntarily left office and is not arrested or charged, Teamsters Local 804 president Vinny Perrone of New York said. “For him it’s impressive,” said Perrone, who is posing as a director on the Teamsters United ticket. “But it’s been about twenty years of concession contracts.

During the convention, attendees called Hoffa “asleep at the wheel”, “in bed with management” and “setting the stage for concessions with Amazon.” A base United Postal Service (UPS) driver called his administration a “gossip with the company” and “negotiating deals.”

With approximately 340,000 UPS employees represented, the Teamsters oversee the largest private collective agreement in the United States. The Teamsters United roster candidates are running for leadership on a platform to fight for a strong contract with UPS (current contract expires in 2023), are working with locals to confront employers, and are organizing Amazon, the second largest employer in the United States. . “I hope to see an environment in which we can fight for a better union with the support of our international,” said Fernando Figueroa, a part-time package manager at UPS and a member of Teamsters Local 512 in Jacksonville, Fla. .

Asked about the biggest issues they face at work, every grassroots Teamster who spoke with Jacobin mentioned two issues: harassment at work by management and the existence of the 22-4 – a new classification of drivers, operating on a system that was negotiated in the last contract – which many say created a system to two gears among truck drivers.

“Management will harass workers for all kinds of little things,” Figueroa said. “Showing up thirty seconds late for a shift, not producing as UPS wants us to produce, not respecting quotas, even though our contract specifically states that there are no production standards. They will harass people to the point of driving home to see if they are home on the days they call.

Figueroa added that UPS management has sanctioned workers with disabilities for showing up one minute late for their shift when they could not drive and were dependent on other means of transportation. He said management also intimidated drivers for signing petitions, harassed elderly employees for working too slowly and fired a pregnant employee because she had a baseless suspicion that she had helped someone steal in the business.

On the harassment issue, Derek Correia, a UPS driver with Teamsters Local 542 in San Diego, said, “Speed. They want you to go faster on routes, overtime, especially during COVID. We worked almost seventy hours a week. Since starting work in 2002, Correia has said harassment has increased and he is blaming some of the blame on his local. “They are in collusion with the management. We had no protection, no support, no representation of any kind, ”says Correia. “I’m looking for a more militant group, which I think we have in Fred Zuckerman and Sean O’Brien” running on the Teamsters United roster for Secretary-General and President, respectively.

“I think there is already a formula based on the organization at the base,” Perrone said of negotiating the next UPS contract. “In my local, I’m already telling people to start putting money aside for a strike because I think that’s the only thing the company is actually going to understand.

TDU’s organizational model focuses on activating a militant minority within the grassroots. New TDU national organizer David Levin said the purpose of their annual conventions was to “make you a better-armed troublemaker when you return home to your people.”

The TDU, which has traditionally served as a splinter group in opposition to international leadership, would finally have, as one supporter described it, a “seat at the table” under new leadership. But conference attendees were not unanimously enthusiastic about the top candidates. O’Brien and Zuckerman have historically opposed TDU. For example, Zuckerman had a “TDU Sucks” vanity tag on his car in the past. The two candidates have since formed a coalition with TDU, which they see as a vital asset.

Despite past controversies, some consider winning Zuckerman and O’Brien a victory for TDU. “The ticket we have is a perfect reflection of today’s society in the sense that popular movements, struggling workers, communities struggling to improve their own conditions are in fact pushing everything in the system further to the left. “said Figueroa. “It’s a real reflection of how the involvement of members in unions can really change the structure from the bottom up.

The results of the upcoming election have huge implications for the approach the Teamsters will take to Amazon. “We need a serious strategy to organize the Amazon workers in our union, and I think we have a chance to do it under the leadership of Sean O’Brien,” says Gabriella Killpack, parcel car driver UPS with Teamsters Local 222 in Salt Lake City, Utah. .

At an Amazon workshop during this weekend’s convention, organizers mapped out the company’s operations in great detail. Joe DeManuelle-Hall, organizer and editor at Working notes, explained the redundancy built into Amazon’s distribution model. For this reason, he explained, a strike at a facility would have no impact on the company’s bottom line because algorithms can locate products within a network of distribution centers and deliver the products to customers without interruption.

From 2015 to 2020, the percentage of Amazon packages the company delivers itself – rather than relying on outside delivery companies – increased from 3% to 67%. As of this year, Amazon represents the fourth largest courier service in terms of market share in the country (UPS is the first) despite entering the market only in 2013. DeManuelle-Hall described Amazon’s strategy as ” an attempt to build a parallel network “.

A grassroots member involved in the campaign to organize Amazon described his local operation as “the scaffolding of a union campaign”. Organizers have requested that specific details regarding tactics and strategy not be shared publicly, although TDU has offered a number of potential organizing tactics, including a massive “salting” program that would encourage organizers to take jobs at Amazon with plans to “build the power of the Interior Workshop.”

“The old guard has let the Amazon organization go under the radar for too long,” says Killpack. To those who wish to join the fight, she says, “I strongly recommend that they contact the local Teamsters union to see if they have an active union campaign.


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